Denise Glover and the annual meeting of the Society of Ethnobiology


Denise just got back from the meeting. The swarm of tornadoes were relatively close, but she’s back in one piece. Here’s her update:

Gary Nabhan (center) with Steve Emslie (left, founder member of SoE) and Cecil Brown (right).

Gary Nabhan (center) with Steve Emslie (left, founding member of SoE) and Cecil Brown (right).

During the middle of finals week, I had to leave campus to attend our annual Society of Ethnobiology meeting—this year at the University of North Texas in Denton, TX. As Conference Coordinator (now Treasurer-Elect), I have been at least partly responsible for the conference every year and so am always just slightly anxious about it before it all comes together. Our theme this year was “Climate Change and Ethnobiology.”

We were lucky to have our long-time Society member and supporter, Gary Paul Nabhan, give the keynote speech as part of our plenary session. Gary is an internationally-celebrated nature writer, food and farming activist, and proponent of conserving the links between biodiversity and cultural diversity. His latest book (just published, May 2013!) is titled Growing Food in a Hotter, Dryer Land: Lessons from Desert Farmers on Adapting to Climate Uncertainty. Along with the plenary, we had sessions on Environmental Philosophy and Biocultural Conservation, Comparative Landscape Ethnoecology, Ethnomedicine, Fire Ecology, and others (see http://ethnobiology.org/conference/upcoming/sessions ). It was a successful conference overall and we managed to not get hit by a swarm of tornadoes (which touched down in Granbury, about 25 miles west of where we were)!

I am happy to announce that next year our Society of Ethnobiology will be having a joint meeting with the Society of Economic Botany in Cherokee, North Carolina (in May 2014); for those interested, keep an eye on our website for more details.

That sounds like a very interesting and timely meeting. Students in our department know that many of these themes are integral to your classroom and all of anthropology. Thanks for the update!

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