Funded Research Opportunity in China


Wei Xing, editor of Sixth Tone

The English-language Chinese new site Sixth Tone recently announced funded research positions for the summer in China. Notably, they express a particular interest in anthropology and various environmental research themes, and clearly discern the close relationship between journalism and the social sciences. Have a look at the information they provide about the application process. The ability to speak Chinese is a prerequisite.

Here are the details provided:

The Sixth Tone Fellowship for field research is calling for applications.

What is the Sixth Tone Fellowship?

The Sixth Tone Fellowship is a field research program on contemporary China initiated and sponsored by Sixth Tone, an English-language news website based in Shanghai, China.

Through fresh takes on trending topics, in-depth features, and illuminating contributions, Sixth Tone covers issues from the perspectives of those most intimately involved to highlight the nuances and complexities of today’s China. In 2017, Sixth Tone won five SOPA (The Society of Publishers in Asia) awards for its excellent reporting on China.

At Sixth Tone, we believe that solid fieldwork and academic discussions are crucial to the work of reporting on China. That’s why we started the Sixth Tone Fellowship together with Fudan Development Institute, an outstanding research organization based in Shanghai. We encourage research into and understanding of China by young scholars from around the world, and we welcome inventive solutions to the challenges China is facing.

The Sixth Tone Fellowship will provide funding for 8 young scholars to come to China for a six weeks’ research trip and conduct fieldwork in locations all over the country.

Does the Sixth Tone Fellowship have a specific research agenda?

Every year, Sixth Tone will pose a fresh research question to young scholars from across the globe. Emphasis will be placed on topics at the cutting edge of Chinese society, including technological innovation, industry and the economy, youth culture, and societal change.

The research topic for the 2018 Sixth Tone Fellowship is “Technological Innovation and Rural China”.

Recently, Chinese technological innovation has attracted media interest from around the world. Meanwhile, the Chinese countryside continues to face significant challenges, such as poverty, depopulation, and backwardness. How can China use technology and innovative thinking to change the impoverished appearance of its vast countryside, improve the lives of its rural population, and close the gap between urban and rural areas?

We encourage applicants to frame their research proposal with the following fields in mind:

1)  E-commerce and the change of rural Chinese society

2)  Agricultural transformation in China

3)  Environmental protection in the countryside

4)  Big data and the transformation of industry in impoverished areas

Successful applicants will participate in a one-week group tour of several Chinese technology ventures and then be split into small groups by research theme and conduct fieldwork on selected topics for four weeks. Sixth Tone will cooperate with the Fudan Development Institute to facilitate academic support and find field site locations for the fellows. During the last week of the program fellows will return to Shanghai to give lectures and attend workshops.

Am I eligible?

This program is open to doctoral students and young scholars with less than five years’ research experience. We will not exclude applicants on the basis of nationality or academic field, although those with backgrounds in economics, sociology, anthropology and environmental science will be given preference for the 2018 fellowship. Applicants should possess a strong command of written English and spoken Chinese. An active presence on social media is a plus.

How much financial support will I receive as a fellow?

Sixth Tone will pay for a round trip airline ticket to Shanghai, all fieldwork related transportation costs incurred within China, as well as food, housing, and health insurance.

Are there any publication requirements?

While in China, each fellow will be responsible for writing at least two approximately 800-word commentary articles, to be published on the Sixth Tone Website. At the end of their fellowship, each of them must submit a 2,000-word policy report based on their fieldwork to both Sixth Tone and the Fudan Development Institute. In addition, fellows will give a seminar at the Fudan Development Institute, reporting on the results of their research. Fellows are encouraged to use their field notes in their future academic work.

What are the dates of the program?

May 20 to June 29, 2018

How to apply?

Applicants should send the following materials to

1)    Personal resume (1 page)

2)    Two letters of recommendation

3)    Research proposal (4-6 pages, double-spaced)

4)    A writing sample.

Sixth Tone will invite a steering committee comprised of experts from the Fudan Development Institute to review candidates’ application materials and make the final selections.

What is the deadline for applications?

Applications will be reviewed starting March 1st, 2018. To receive full consideration, applications should be received by that date.


A New Course on the Horizon — CONN 397: Migrants and the Global City


Nepalese migrants on the waterfront corniche, with the gleaming skyscraper of Doha’s West Bay in the background

Hi all,

Professor Robin Jacobson and I are planning a new course for the Spring of 2019. The tentative title for the course is Migrants and the Global City, and while much of the course will happen on campus, it also includes trips to both Amsterdam, Netherlands, and Doha, Qatar. We intend to hold an interest meeting for students in February, so please look for our forthcoming announcement. But in the meantime, Robin and I have just finished scouting the possibilities for students in Qatar. While this is all still fresh in my mind (I’m on the plane home now), let me provide a glimpse of some of the activities we have in mind.


Deep in the bowels of Souq Waqif

Architecture, urban space, and urban planning are a fascinating topic of study in Qatar. We’ll visit the ultra modern West Bay with a diverse set of glowing high rises ringed by the water. In contrast, we’ll stay in Souq Waqif, a revitalized Middle Eastern bazaar in the historic center of the city. It’s an impressive and bustling public space, worthy of attention itself, but walk a few blocks and more contrasts await. Robin and I wandered from the glittering streets of the Souq, scrubbed by migrants on hands and knees every morning, to the broken, trash-filled sidewalks of the nearby neighborhood where such workers might live. As Qatari citizens suburbanized in decades past, the core of the old city was abandoned to the legions of low wage foreign workers who make up a majority of the current population. In Qatar, migrants make up almost 90% of the total population, and while


A villa in the center city, abandoned to foreign migrants in years past as Qatari citizens moved to the suburbs

they work everywhere, many of them reside offstage from the impressive city. In the Industrial Area, on the fringes of the city, labor camps fill the horizons, and on their day off, migrants from around the Indian Ocean gather to shop, eat, and socialize. Robin and I met with some old friends of mine and they drove us to a labor camp and the market area that workers frequent on their single day off in their work week. We hope to arrange a lunch where each student gets to meet a transnational labor migrant and learn a little bit more about their lives and experiences, and to see some of the Industrial Area. Migrants are everywhere you look, and they make use of the city in their own ways. Students will be able to experience and explore the energy they bring to the urban landscape, and the diversity that makes up this small Gulf State.


For midday prayer on Friday, hundreds of muslim foreign workers pray on the city streets

Students will also get to talk with others who live, work, and study in Qatar. We had the pleasure to meet with scholars and those working for the government in various capacities. Students will get to connect with their peers at one of the many universities in the city, officials at the Ministry of Urban Planning, and Museum curators. In museums, the state oftentimes presents and codifies its national narrative — the stories nations tell themselves about themselves. In the Msheireb Museums, we encountered the stories Qatar has to tell about slavery, abolished in 1952, and about the transition from an economy based on pearls to one based on oil. We want our students to engage and explore those narratives, and to assess how the nation thinks about the integration of migrants into the stories it tells about itself.

DSCF5317 2

In the heart of the Industrial Area, thousands of foreign workers gather on Friday to shop, socialize, and connect with friends from home

If you’ve never been to the Middle East, this trip is going to reshape the way you think about the region. You’ll be safer than you are in America, and you’ll have an opportunity to engage with a sort of diversity that makes America look provincial. And Doha’s only half of our plan, as we’re also going to be traveling to Amsterdam!

If this might be of interest to you, look for our forthcoming announcement for a February student interest meeting.




A Qatari traditional band rollicking on the cobblestones of Souq Waqif. Note the bagpipes — an instrument that traces its roots deep in Middle Eastern history.

Emily Katz’s Senior Thesis Project

[Seniors in the SOAN department have the opportunity of pursuing a field-based research project that culminates in a senior thesis. I’ve asked our seniors to briefly describe the research project they are beginning to configure for fieldwork in the remainder of our academic year.]

When I think about how I learned about sex and communication, there are specific moments and conversations that stick out to me – moments that shaped the way I thought, what I perceived as normal, and my understanding of where I stood in relation to this “normal.” I find this process – the collection of moments and stories and facts that make up a person’s understanding of sex, their body, and their sexuality – particularly intriguing because of the way it influences how people engage in sexual interactions. As a member of Peer Allies, a group of twenty students on campus who focus on sexual IMG_4178assault support, prevention, and education, I spend a lot of my time working to understand why sexual assault happens. The longer I’ve been involved, the more I’ve come to realize that although we cannot do anything to ensure we, or someone we love, will not be sexually assaulted, we can take small steps to change our culture that allows it to happen so frequently and so normally. In order to change this culture, I believe we need to be shifting the way we learn about and talk about sex and communication. In American culture, this is particularly complicated, as we live in a society that is made up of many ethnicities, religions, and cultures, yet we often privilege only a small portion of these – especially throughout our public education systems.

For my senior thesis, I plan to investigate how the process of learning about sex and communication for people of different cultural identities (within American society) affects their conceptions of consent. How do we learn to engage in sexual interactions, and perhaps more important, how do we learn to communicate during them? How does this affect the quality and safety of these interactions? What roles do power and privilege play? I want to look into the intersection of formal and informal avenues of the learning process by comparing the education high school students receive in school to what they are receiving at home, and specifically how that differs across cultural identities. Ultimately, how does this process affect people’s conception of consent?

For this project, I will be focusing on how high school students learn about sex here in Tacoma. Although Washington state law requires HIV prevention education, as well as age-appropriate, “medically accurate sexual health education” (Washington State Learning Standards), and just this year implemented new health standards guidelines that include education surrounding gender identity, healthy relationships, and consent, districts are still able to interpret and implement the guidelines however they feel is appropriate. This means that the quality and depth of sex education greatly varies across the state. I will focus my time interviewing high school students, primarily 16-18 years old, in the Tacoma Public School system. Throughout this process, I will be conducting semi-structured interviews, as well as using visual methodology to map out how they learned about their bodies, sex, sexuality, and consent. I plan to sit in on sex education classes in various high schools across Tacoma whenever I’m allowed, as well as analyze the sex education materials used in these classes.


SOAN Major Elena Becker Wins 1st Place at the SfAA Student Poster Competition

We are very pleased to share the news that SOAN major Elena Becker (’17) has won first place at the 2017 Society for Applied Anthropology’s Student Poster Competition in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her winning poster, titled Impacts of Development Discourse on Appropriate Technology “Solutions,” drew on fieldwork conducted in Madagascar, which was subsequently developed into her SOAN and Honors Program thesis. In addition to the stiff competition from her SOAN peers, the SfAA’s Student Poster Competition draws entrants from colleges and universities across the country and beyond, including many graduate students, so winning first place is an extremely impressive accomplishment. We asked Elena to describe her research and experience attending the SfAA conference:

Elena Becker with her poster at the Society for Applied Anthropology conference.

When I went to Madagascar to study abroad in 2015 I had a vague idea that my required, month-long research would somehow involve rural to urban migrations and the preservation of cultural practices in cities. Spoiler alert: it didn’t. When I actually got to Antananarivo I started noticing small, metal cookstoves littering the streets. These stoves (called fatapera) were sold on every corner, used in street food stalls, and fired up in middle-class homes three times a day. Their omnipresence piqued my interest, and I ultimately focused my research on how researchers can apply characteristics of traditional stoves to alternative models in order to increase the latter’s popularity.

I re-appropriated this fieldwork when it came time to write my senior thesis in the fall of 2016. Although I kept my focus on the cookstove case study, I created a new framework for it, this time focusing on the way that development organizations (inaccurately) imagine and engage with the Global South as they develop and distribute technologies that they imagine to be “appropriate” for those spaces. A few weeks ago I was fortunate to present this research in poster form at the 2017 Society for Applied Anthropology conference in Santa Fe, NM. As I’ve found in previous years, this was a great opportunity to meet other students, engage with professional anthropologists, and to get feedback on my work and I left the conference with lots of exciting ideas and new directions to explore!

Congratulations on receiving this well-deserved recognition for your insightful work, Elena!


Anthropology Takes Center Stage at This Year’s Southeast Asia Symposium

Our third annual Southeast Asia Symposium, which takes place this Friday and Saturday, will incorporate programming of interest to folks from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives, but particularly those interested in anthropology, ethnomusicology, and art. The events are free and open to the public.



The symposium is the centerpiece of our Southeast Asia Program, and provides a forum for undergraduates who have participated in our LIASE fieldschool courses to share their research with the broader campus community, while also serving as a forum for Northwest scholars whose research or pedagogy addresses Southeast Asian environmental and cultural topics to come together and collaborate. This year marks our first faculty panel on Southeast Asia’s role in the liberal arts, which includes three anthropologists discussing topics ranging from gender to music to mediation of distance.

Peter Brosius. Photo by Paul Efland.

Peter Brosius. Photo by Paul Efland.

The symposium takes place this October 28-29, with keynote talks on both evenings: on Friday the 28th, renowned environmental anthropologist Peter Brosius will speak on his pioneering work on cultural approaches to conservation and environmental activism.

On Saturday the 29th, Arahmaiani, an internationally known Indonesian performance artist, women’s rights activist, and political dissident, will discuss her work and career.

We will be having batik workshops on both days as well (sign up in advance), using sustainable, naturally derived dyes.

The symposium concludes Saturday evening with a free performance of Indonesian music by the Northwest’s premiere Javanese music ensemble, Gamelan Pacifica, in Rasmussen Rotunda.

Gamelan Pacifica

Gamelan Pacifica

The full schedule is available online here, with links to more information on each event. We hope to see you there!

Salam hangat,

Indonesia Field Course Interest Meeting

2017 Field School Course Interest Meeting

Wednesday, October 12th at 4pm in Murray Boardroom

The Puget Sound LIASE Southeast Asia Program offers a field course each spring and summer, involving a semester of study on campus, and then a subsidized trip to Indonesia at the end of the semester (mid-May to early June). The 2017 Southeast Asia field school course is SOAN 312, which will be taught by Gareth Barkin, and which is cross-listed with Global Development Studies and Asian Studies. The course will cover the anthropology of Southeast Asia with a focus on Indonesian cultural and environmental topics. Those interested must complete an application, as there is usually competition for available spaces in the course. Students who are accepted to the course will attend class throughout the spring semester, and then travel to Central Java, Indonesia, for a three-week period of intensive, experiential learning, cultural socialization, and individual research projects.

Come to the interest meeting to learn more about the application process, the course focus, subsidized trip expenses, the timeline, and the abroad experience in Indonesia.

The University of Puget Sound’s Southeast Asia programming is made possible with the support of the Henry Luce Foundation, via the Luce Initiative on Asian Studies and the Environment (LIASE).

Summer Research Update: Sam Carp and his project in Ghana

Untitled2Hi all,

I asked the SOAN students conducting AHSS summer research projects to drop us a line and update us about their exciting projects. While most of Sam’s time in Ghana is spent off the grid, he was able to communicate this to me, and he sent along a few pictures as well! Here’s what he had to say:

It was all a dream: Volunteering and researching in southwest Ghana…

Oh man, I swear if I hear one more rooster crow I am going to lose it! It’s not so bad usually, but when you’re trying to sleep in past 5:00 a.m., it’s not conducive to live in a village where everybody owns at least ten chickens. It’s 1:00 p.m. now in Frankadua, a small farming community in the Volta Region of Ghana located about two hours northwest of the country’s capital city, Accra. I’ve just sat down to drink a second cup of instant coffee after having a lunch of peanut soup, chicken, Untitled6and rice, a dish I know I am going to make when I get back home. Now that the rainy season has come, the temperature has decreased to about 25 degrees Celsius (or 80 degrees Fahrenheit) with only moderate humidity, and people have begun to walk around in brightly colored shirts and long pants. Kids are running around in their school uniforms and playing on the porch of the volunteer house, and the people of the village are out and about selling goods like pepper and corn, or laundry detergents, or out working hard on their farms.

It has been a long four and half weeks so far, but overall my experience here in Ghana has exceeded my initial expectations. Before I left, the piece of advice I was given the most from friends, family members, and professors was to go into this trip with few expectations and to expect my daily experiences to help govern the direction my volunteer work and research would progress. Now that over a month has passed, and with only two weeks left in my journey, I am so glad this was also the piece of advice that I took to Untitled5heart the most. Since I was going to be a volunteer, student, and tourist all at the same time, I knew I was going to have my work cut out for me when dealing with how to balance all of the things that I wanted, or at least thought I should be doing.

So far, so good though. Each day I wake up at 5:30 to go work on the farm that my volunteer program helps to manage. There we help to harvest corn and cassava (a type of root), plant beans, cabbage, and eggplant, and help to weed with machetes and turn the soil. Work on the farm ends around 8-8:30 because it begins to get too hot to do much more physical labor, and at this point we begin the 25 minute walk through the mud (because it’s the rainy season) back to the house to have a breakfast of either pancakes, toast, or egg sandwiches. After this, I usually work on my research or help with various projects around the village. By four, I am usually done with whatever research I have done for the day, which usually entails doing interviews, having short conversations, or conducting simple observations. By this time most volunteers are also back at the house playing with the children, who are done with school by then.

Untitled4My experience so far, though amazing and mind blowing, hasn’t been as balanced and smooth as the description above would appear to depict. Every day has been filled with conflicting emotions and decisions, both with the volunteer work and the research that I have been doing. Frankadua is a town stuck in a cycle of poverty, mainly because it is inhabited by 90 percent subsistence farmers. Because of this, it takes a lot of thought and discussion to coordinate volunteer projects that are beneficial to both the volunteers and the locals. IVHQ is a program that generally hosts volunteers for 2-10 weeks, and because of this, there are a lot of projects that go unfinished. Many volunteers also come in with differing opinions, and while we all get along, we have to constantly be discussing how we want to be interacting with the kids that come by the house, or how we teach in the schools, or how we appropriately give money for varying purposes around the village. The conflicting feelings also accompany the work I have been doing for school. I have made a lot of Untitled8friends and met many engaging and hard working people so far through my interviews, and while they understand that my ability to help them is severely limited, they still consistently ask me for things that I am not able to give them — like heavy machinery, or contact info for non-profits.

While I am not able to help the people that I meet as much as I want to, they have drawn me towards countless realizations and understandings of the realities of the world we live in and how varying systems interacting on a global scale affect the lives of people all over the world. I’m excited to get back to America, but when I leave I know I’m going to miss the experiences I’ve had here so far. Hopefully my volunteer work and research leaves me in a position where I will be able to continue to think about the work I have done in Ghana and what I want to be doing in the future.

So glad to hear from you, Sam, and good luck wrapping up your research. We’ll see you on campus in a few weeks!