Sam Carp’s AHSS Summer Research Plans

samcarpHi all,

As I noted in last week’s post, students at the University of Puget Sound can compete for funding to support summer research endeavors. Our department’s students were particularly successful last year, and again this year we’ve had numerous proposals successfully funded. In short, the AHSS Summer Research Awards, varying from $3250 to $3750, allow students to pursue an in-depth research project over the summer months. I’ve asked each of this year’s batch of students to tell us a little bit about what they’ll be doing with their time, energy, and grant monies in the coming summer. Here’s what Sam had to say about his new project:

My research intends to analyze the affects of industrialization on the development of small-scale agriculture in the urban and peri-urban regions of Accra, the capital city of Ghana. Since the 1980s, increased urban development and a rise in industrial operations in Accra have had a detrimental affect on the ability of small plot urban farmers to cultivate land for agricultural purposes, resulting in a loss of both income and food for thousands of families. This is problematic because, as urban Ghanafarming becomes less of a priority and large-scale farms become more consolidated in rural areas, the crops and vegetables they produce become harder to access, and food security is decreased for those living in more populated areas. Throughout my observation and interview process, I will be working alongside and speaking to varying members of Accra’s governmental organizations and farming communities. I will also volunteering at an orphanage and working to grow crops for the children and volunteers working in the program. Hopefully I’ll also be able to find some time to travel around Ghana with the people I meet volunteering. I’m excited to see where this research leads me!

Good luck with this project, Sam, and we look forward to getting an update from you once you reach Ghana.

 

Andrew

SOAN Club Social on Friday, May 13

Salmon Beach

The SOAN Club invites you to come celebrate the end of a great semester!

On Friday, May 13th we’ll be hosting an informal gathering at Andrew Gardner’s house (cabin 56) at Salmon Beach to wrap up this academic year. Feel free to drift in and out any time between 4 and 8pm. If your family is in town you’re welcome to bring them too! The more the merrier.

Salmon Beach is about fifteen minutes away by car, and at least one SOAN club leader will be driving. If you’d like to come but need a ride email Elena Becker at esbecker@pugetsound.edu to coordinate. If you want to drive yourself and you have never been to the Beach before, shoot Andrew (gardner@pugetsound.edu) a quick email for directions and parking instructions. It’s pretty straightforward, but you’ll need a code for the gate. And while we’ll have a few snacks around, you should bring your own food or drink.

Congratulations on making it to May, and we’ll see you on the 13th!

Note from Andrew: Carpool if you can, bring something if you want!

Kathryn Stutz’s AHSS summer research plans

Hi all,

As many of you know, students at the University of Puget Sound can compete for funding to support summer research endeavors. Our department’s students were particularly successful last year, and again this year we’ve had numerous proposals successfully funded. In short, the AHSS Summer Research Awards, varying from $3250 to $3750, allow students to pursue an in-depth research project over the summer months. I’ve asked each of this year’s batch of students to tell us a little bit about what they’ll be doing with their time, energy, and grant monies in the coming summer. Here’s what Kathryn had to say about her new project:

IMG_8619

Style options, from the material detritus of the central neighborhood razed for new development in Doha, and now part of the collection in one of the three new Mshereib Museums.

This summer, I’ll be examining how museums in different national contexts communicate notions of individual identity, community, ethnicity, nationality, and global citizenship. 

 My journey will start off in Doha, the capital city of Qatar, a prosperous nation on the Arabian peninsula. As Qatar has risen on the world stage in recent years, foreign professionals have been brought in to consult on many design projects, including the construction of several new national museums. By conducting ethnographic interviews with museum staff and consultants, I’ll investigate how these transnational connections affect curation and exhibit design, and how the new Qatari museums communicate their national identity, and place themselves within the global museum scene.
 
Following several weeks in Qatar, I’ll travel to London, the home base for several museum consultancy firms involved in the Doha-area construction. There, I’ll attempt to unravel the other end of the transnational museum design business, and see how consultants mediate differences between their own culture and the culture in which they create exhibit-based narratives. I’ll also compare Qatar’s museums with historically-entrenched, traditional museum efforts in London and in other prominent cities around Western Europe. 
 
This project will allow me to expand upon several themes I’ve uncovered while studying issues of identity and indigeneity in the museums of the Pacific Northwest, and to begin to get a feel for the enormous scale of the museum networks in our globalizing world. I’m so excited to get started on this research! 
We’re really excited about this research, Kathryn, and as I know from experience — there are so many interesting things going on in museums in Qatar. You know that it’s on the hotter side there in the summer, right?
Andrew

SOAN Senior Research Symposium Today!

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A scene from last year’s SOAN Senior Symposium

Hi all,

The SOAN Seniors will be presenting their research on posters today in the Rotunda. Stop by and check out the fascinating and diverse projects of our department’s seniors.

SOAN Senior Research Symposium
Rotunda, 1:00 to 3:00
Thursday, April 28
Some food and drink available

And note that there’s an informal SOAN reception at Engine House 9 (E9) afterwards, from 5 to 7. Please join us!

Andrew

Dr. Farah Al-Nakib on the Urban History of Kuwait

Farah al-Nakib_0Dr. Farah Al-Nakib, an Assistant Professor of History at the American University of Kuwait and the Director of the Center for Gulf Studies, will visit Puget Sound on Monday evening. Her lecture will encapsulate her new book, Kuwait Transformed: A History of Oil and Urban Life (Stanford University Press).

In this book, Al-Nakib traces how decades of urban planning, suburbanization, and privatization eroded the open and tolerant society that had long existed on the northern shores of the Arabian Gulf, resulting in the insularity, xenophobia, and divisiveness that characterizes social relation in Kuwait today. In her analysis, the story of this tectonic shift is written into the urban landscape of Kuwait City.

Key Information:
Date: Monday, April 25, 2016
Where: Wyatt 109
Time: 6:00 to 7:30 PM

Here’s some additional information. We hope to see you there!

2016 Al Nakib Lecture Puget Sound 2

 

Warren King George speaks on campus tomorrow evening!

kinggeorgeASUPS Lectures is hosting Warren KingGeorge of the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe to speak on campus on April, 20th, this Wednesday at 6:30pm in the Tahoma Room.

Warren is the Oral Historian for the Muckleshoot tribe. His talk is titled The Importance of Place, and he will be speaking on issues of sovereignty, resources, and co-management facing Indian tribes today.

We hope you can be there!

 

Danya Axelrad-Hausman Wins Major Award

Danya

Danya receiving the Distinguished Undergraduate Student Paper award at the Pacific Sociological Association annual conference in Oakland, California.

Senior Danya Axelrad-Hausman has won the 2016 Pacific Sociological Association’s Award for Distinguished Undergraduate Student Paper for her senior thesis essay titled “Responses to Environmentalism and Environmental Policy as Mechanisms of Exclusion.” The PSA represents the entire U.S. West Coast and this award is given to only one student per year, so it represents a significant honor. Danya told us that she is very honored to have received the award, and had a great experience presenting her research at the PSA meetings.

Danya’s research focuses on how racial identity, gender, and other sociocultural factors influence environmental activism, and unpacks racialized constructs surrounding environmental purity. Danya shared her paper’s abstract with us:

Taking into account the unique sociocultural and sociopolitical climate that shapes the contemporary environmental justice discourse, this paper provides an account of the processes of identity formation that individuals and communities undergo when participating in environmental justice movements. Specifically, this research examines how socioeconomic status, race and gender influence participation in environmental justice advocacy. Through this approach I address the following questions: How are individuals and groups harnessing social and cultural factors, such as gender, socioeconomic status and racial identity, to drive activism? How does identity shape environmental activism and social movements, and how is environmental activism ultimately shaped by identity? Finally, I examine the policies and discourses that are shaped by racialized notions of environmental purity and ultimately reinforce systems of exclusion and marginalization. Through the examination of these driving questions I find that individual identity influences conceptions of the environment, environmentalism and structures of power. The construction of collective identity by environmental justice organization and activists connects the physical and social realities of environmental injustice. Finally, a perceived disconnect between the environmental movement and the environmental justice movement perpetuates a tangible disconnect and barrier to the environmental justice movement meeting its goals on an institutional level.